Process

How important is this piece to you? Is it a valuable piece historically? Do you have a budget in mind for framing? Is your style eclectic or defined? Is this a piece that you want to protect and preserve for the long term?

Your project presents questions, and our task is to analyze you and your artwork–content, color, visual themes, personal meaning, and balance all these pertinent factors as we explore options. There’s no cookie cutter approach, and there’s no “right” answer–only the one that works for you and your artwork. No matter what kind of material you present us with–oil paintings, wooden boomerangs, Hermes scarves or old feed bags from your grandmothers’ farm–our talent is synthesizing all the various elements you are concerned with and sending you home with a finished work that’s highly pleasing and reasonably priced.

After asking questions and getting a feel for your goals and ideas, our approach is to play with a variety of stylistic options. Sometimes our first pick turns out to be the best, other times it takes a little longer. We match frame to matting, deciding how best to display the artwork within the frame–and finally discuss technical issues that may affect production and cost.

Your artwork is stored safely away until it enters the production process. We tailor all mounting decisions to the type of artwork, preferring the “less is more” approach to changing the original condition of any given artwork or object. When exceptions are made to standard procedures, it is only with your express permission and understanding of the pros and cons. Glazing choices are recommended based upon the hanging and display conditions, the value of the piece, potential exposure to light over time, and budgetary concerns. We offer every option from regular clear to museum glass and acrylic.

All work is done by hand by me and my production assistants–it never leaves the premises except with you. At the very end of the framing process, we offer delivery, wall design and hanging services should you need these.

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